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Monday, April 27

Thursday, September 19

  1. msg Transformative Learning Theory message posted Transformative Learning Theory The ideas of social, cognitive, and teacher presence in the online learning environment is catching…
    Transformative Learning Theory
    The ideas of social, cognitive, and teacher presence in the online learning environment is catching fire within the college-level e-learning environment. A recent coursework assignment in the doctoral program I attend, required an investigation of Mezirow and his theory of Transformative Learning. I was excited to know that the wisdom and knowledge of Mezirow is being deeply investigated, in relation to pre-service teacher/instructor development. Another opportunity to tap into the expertise of those, like Mezirow, who were ahead of their time!
    12:07 pm
  2. msg Your entry on Habermas message posted Your entry on Habermas Perhaps the idea of "expecting" all educated individuals to contribute to the public sphe…
    Your entry on Habermas
    Perhaps the idea of "expecting" all educated individuals to contribute to the public sphere is a bit rash. However, I do foresee that educated individuals will desire to contribute to the intellect of the public spheres, which at this time are growing exponentially. It seems to be the nature of the "educated individual" to desire to share his or her expertise and knowledge with interested parties. Accordingly, knowledge-sharing is perpetuated from one individual to another via connective spaces. It is my view that this explosion of connective learning spaces, even through mobile devices, will be the center of learning within this century. MOOCs have provided millions of interested learners the opportunity and venue for learning outside the conventions of the "Ivory Tower" and will span new innovations for learning anywhere, any time, and any way one chooses to learn. I, for one, am excited by the potential of public learning spheres now and beyond.
    12:00 pm
  3. msg Your entry on Habermas message posted Your entry on Habermas In my view, public spheres are a valuable venue for e-learning. E-learning is about the learner. To…
    Your entry on Habermas
    In my view, public spheres are a valuable venue for e-learning. E-learning is about the learner. Today's learners are of diverse age groups, cultures, and backgrounds. The e-learning enterprise is just beginning to understand the importance of the public sphere as a valid space for learning, seen through the increasing interests in MOOC's and other open resources for learning. The e-learning environment must eventually include open resources and open learning spaces to stay competitive and meet the desires and needs of diverse learners. The "Ivory Tower" mentality may be put off by this view, but it is a reality of the 21st Century learner and must become a considerable component of the learning process today.
    11:49 am
  4. msg Want to share this message posted Want to share this Thank you, Glen. The resources you share are highly helpful!!!
    Want to share this
    Thank you, Glen. The resources you share are highly helpful!!!
    11:39 am

Monday, May 27

  1. page Communities of Practice edited ... The learning climate had intensified due to the development of globalization and technological…
    ...
    The learning climate had intensified due to the development of globalization and technologically enhanced business formats and educational methodologies. Wenger intentionally continued the study of group learning and promoted the concept of the social learning perspective. From this research, Wenger developed a new theory called, Communities of Practice (CoP; Wenger, 1998). Although the concept of formal group learning was not new, Wenger's theory marked new ways to view and function within communities of practitioners. Following his research, Wenger published a signpost volume, defining and expounding on the conceptual assumptions, characteristics, and learning opportunities available through community learning. The book was titled, //Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning, and Identity// (Wenger, 1998).
    This work was significant and timely for a number of reasons. First, organizations worldwide were faced with the challenge of finding innovative ways in which to transfer learning across the globe from one worker to the next. Secondly, countries around the world were frazzled by attempts to improve the learning of respective citizens, in the hopes of producing citizens that would be well-able to function in an information-knowledge economy. Finally, as institutions of learning promoted technologically augmented programs, colleges and universities were hard pressed to unearth efficient ways in which to promote learning through collaborative interaction and engagement. Although the affirmation that social learning is a centuries-old human activity, it was not well understood, in terms of global organizations, citizenship, or learning environments. Wenger's theory and newly released guiding manuscript addressed each of these contemporary learning issues through the social theory of CoP (Wenger, 1998).
    {CoP_3 Wenger Social Theory.jpg} {SOCIAL_LEARNING_THEORY.png} Community of Practice
    Theoretical Framework
    Wenger launched the theoretical framework of the CoP by defining it thus:
    (view changes)
    12:06 am

Sunday, May 26

  1. page Communities of Practice edited ... In Wenger's (2001) view most people today, hold membership in one or more communities of pract…
    ...
    In Wenger's (2001) view most people today, hold membership in one or more communities of practice, whether the membership is a conscious effort or one of unconscious interest. Moreover, within these communities, people, for differing rationales and motivations, function in differing roles and degrees of participation within specific categories. Wenger, E. & Trayner, B. (2011a) has determined five categories of participation in the CoP structure, which reflect the extent to which the participant is involved in a particular CoP: 1) core group, 2) active participants, 3) occasional participants, 4) peripheral participants, and 5) transactional participants. The core group is typically the smallest number of participants, but the ones who are the most enthusiastic about the community, in terms of sharing knowledge and expertise, and keenness to cultivate essential relationships with other participants. Active participants are professional practitioners, whose expertise is recognizable to other participants. Their degree of engagement and participation is elevated, in terms of interaction with other participants, and they regularly contribute to the community, as a whole. Occasional participants are generally less active and visit the particular CoP less often. Largely, they contribute resources or expertise, or join an activity or discussion of explicit interest. Peripheral participants continually connect with the particular CoP, but exhibit less commitment and overall participation. These may be professionals, who float between multiple CoP groups, gathering resources and sharing in discussions, as time and other commitments permit. Transactional participants are non-members, as they come and go freely with little interaction with other members, except to gather access to information and resources of interest (Wenger & Trayner, 2011a). Higher degrees of participation involve a sense of citizenship and belonging to the CoP, which heightens membership identity and sensitivity to the domain. A higher degree of involvement regulates participation, in terms of engaging with other members, and contributing regularly to the extent one's practice competence (Wenger, 1998).
    Wenger purports that the five categories of participation can and does shift recurrently in the CoP. For example, core-group mentors, after a period, may move onto other areas of interest or demands. Active apprentices may determine to contribute more frequently and be in a new place of competence to begin mentoring other members, vertically and horizontally. Peripheral participants may move into a professional position, in which higher competence levels are demanded. The new demands can become the basis for renewed interest and involvement in the CoP, moving him or her to the active participant position. Additionally, new apprentices will join the CoP, which sustains its growth and viability, as a valuable learning space (Borzillo, Aznar & Schmitt, 2011).
    {CoP_10.jpg}
    Summary
    The 21st Century has brought with it a mind-set change, in terms of global education and the formation of technologically augmented educational environments, producing the knowledge-society. A significant paradigm shift has changed the focus of education from teaching to learning. The demands for comprehensive learning and professional competence across the world, now includes, the necessity for aptitudes that have scantly been significant to learning, in times past: Engagement, interaction, information and communication technology (ICT) skills, and the capacity to work, learn, and communicate with others across distances (Karlovitz, 2012). In light of these demands and the promotion of learning more than teaching, conferences and seminars around the globe are bringing together experts in diverse fields together, in order to discuss and envision innovative ways to change directions and educate the world's citizens from a learning perspective. Additionally, over the past two decades, the world's peoples have affiliated themselves with more and more opportunities to connect with others in distant lands for the purposes of socialization and learning (United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization [UNESCO]; 2012).
    (view changes)
    11:19 pm
  2. file CoP_10.jpg uploaded
    11:18 pm

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